Quilted Ornaments

 

The craft fair for the Linus Project is coming up in November.  In the past I contributed boxes of sports related ceramic pieces that we were no longer going to carry on our website.  I thought it was a great way to help out the Linus Project and remove them from my inventory.  This year I am going to add as many quilted ornaments as I can get done!  I have so much fun making them, just my finger tips get very sore if I do too many at once. LOL. 

Just gather some of your favorite fabric scraps that will compliment your Christmas tree decor.  You can even make them with a certain someone in mind.quiltedornamentsupplies.jpg I bought the pattern from Herrschners so many years ago, I made hundreds of them for the craft faires I used to sell at.  Give yourself plenty of time.   So many times, people are of the impression that I get all these crafts done with a snap of my fingers.  LOL,  I wish!  But sit me in front of some holiday movies with all my supplies at hand and the time just flies by.

To start, I found an easy way to mark the centers of each end.  Using 2 rubber bands, bisect the ornament.

quiltedball1.jpg

Using a felt pen, mark off the “X” at both ends and remove the rubber bands.   This is the starting point for the ornament.  To create the quilted look, you will need your choice of fabric, cut in to 2.5″ squares, an iron, and straight pins.  The first round takes 8 squares of your first fabric choice.  Using the iron, fold them in half and press them.  With a pin in hand and your first ironed square, place the pin in the center of the folded edge.  Push that pin and fabric into the styrofoam ball in one of the corners you marked with felt pen.  

quiltedornament6.jpg

Then, still using the folded edge, take one side of the outer edge and fold it down to the center of the bottom edge and pin it down.

quiltedornament7.jpg

Repeat with the other side, you should have a triangle with the folded edge meeting at the center.  Repeat this process on the opposite corner next, then the remaining corners.  Now, repeat on the other side of ball, where your rubber band felt “X” is.  

quiltedball2.jpg

For the next round, you will need 16 squares of your next color choice.  The Triangle is completed with the same process as the first round.  Your first pin is placed in the center of the triangle, approximately 1/2″ down from the first rows center point. 

quiltedball3.jpg

Once you have the first 4 in, all on the center fold of the first row.  You will place the next 4 starting in the fold between triangles.  Again repeat on the other side of ball too.

quiltedball4.jpg

The final round is also made of 16 squares of your last choice of fabric.  You will start this round exactly the same way as the previous one.  You will find that you will need to trim the second sides triangles as you place them. 

quiltedball5.jpg

The final rounds meet in the middle of the ball and you will cover the edges with a piece of 1/2″ ribbon.

quiltedball8.jpg

The only pins you should see now are the ones you placed to hold the ribbon on.  I add a piece of gold or silver elastic cord to use for hanging the ornament on your tree.  There are so many color variations to choose from, I always find another one I like more.  By the time you have this one done your fingers might be sore.   So if you have fun with the first one, pace your self and allow time for your sore fingers to recover.  I have a leather finger sleeve I use, I can’t seem to just do one at a time.

My Grandma, who I miss daily and I cross stitched some designs for the centers (first row).  I will have to posts some pictures of those too.  Have fun and let me know if you come up with some creative versions of this ornament.   Cyn 

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About designbycyn

Sonoma County, California ceramic enthusiasts Cyn and Steven Gradek have worked in the clay medium since 1996. They had a retail store where they held classes and provided the essentials for fellow ceramic enthusiasts. The business evolved into producing for other retail outlets and artist. Which quickly grew and they closed the retail storefront and concentrated on the wholesale business. With their 3 children raised and on their own, they had time to pursue their own creativity. Cyn learned how to embroider from her Grandma Cirner at a young age. After that she found sewing, cross stitching, crocheting, well you get the jist, LOL. She hasn't met a craft that she hasn't liked. Blogging was suggested by her youngest daughter, Colleen. At first it was a battle to get her to try it, but eventually Cyn started to enjoy the exercise. The blog on Cyn's website designbycyn.com was limiting, so Colleen got her started with Wordpress. Hope you enjoy her Adventures with Creativity!
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